Holidays Act
Blog

Mondayised holidays

April 27, 2015

Sam

Payroll expert at FlexiTime

3 minute read

Mondayised public holidays have been around for a long time when it comes to Christmas and New Year. In 2014 the government decided that ANZAC and Waitangi Day should be Mondayised as well. That avoids the nasty one-in-seven year situation where Monday-Friday workers were missing out on two public holidays in the same year.

 

What is a Mondayised public holiday?

For most people, the Mondayised holiday is relatively easy to understand. When a public holiday falls on a weekend, if you normally work that day it is treated as your public holiday as you would expect. If you don’t work on weekends then the following Monday becomes your holiday.

Public Holiday Table | FlexiTime Blog

If that seems like a lot to get your head around, the good news is that if you’re using PayHero or FlexiTime, Mondayised public holidays are a breeze. Our automated public holidays feature does everything for you, working out from your employee’s details or timesheet history which are their otherwise working days and picking the right day to treat as a public holiday.

 

Other factors to consider

As a payroll nerd I’m always interested in the quirks of the Holidays Act, so I thought I’d mention a couple of counter-intuitive, albeit relatively rare scenarios that can occur.

Ellen works part time in a bar and neither the Saturday nor the Monday are an otherwise working day for her. However, because some of her colleagues have gone away for the weekend, she gets called in to work both days. What should she get paid?

Because Saturday isn’t an otherwise working day her holiday is mondayised and Saturday is paid at the standard rate with no alternate day accrued. On the Monday, Ellen gets paid time and a half for working on the public holiday, but because it isn’t an otherwise working day for her she doesn’t get an alternate day. Because her pay week finishes on Sunday, she is surprised to see on her payslip for that week that she didn’t get time and a half for working on Anzac Day.

Here’s another one for you. Louis works Tuesdays through Fridays. He’s asked in specially to work on Anzac Saturday. What should he get paid?

Unfortunately for Louis, because Saturday isn’t an otherwise working day his holiday gets mondayised and his Saturday work is paid at the standard rate with no alternate day accruing. And since Monday isn’t an otherwise working day he doesn’t get paid anything for that day. So poor Louis gets nothing for working on Anzac day. (Hopefully his employer is kind hearted and will pay him time and a half anyway.)

Mondayised holidays can in fact disadvantage some employees. They were enacted to ensure regular Monday to Friday employees will always get 11 days of public holidays. However there is no similar protection for workers not on Monday to Friday work patterns. Say a hard-working employee works 6 days a week - Tuesday to Sunday. As the law stands they won’t get paid for the holidays that fall on a Monday (at least four a year!). Employers can always do better than what the law states, and it seems only fair that the employee should get the Monday public holidays in this instance.

Sam

Payroll expert at FlexiTime

Take the next step with PayHero
Join thousands of Kiwi companies doing payroll better.